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razberry
Junior Member



36 Posts

Posted - 23 Apr 2009 :  3:05:45 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add razberry to your friends list Send razberry a Private Message
Hi all
heres a thought...
As endurance riders when you look at prospective endurance horses what partcular points to you pay attention to?
what in particular would draw you too them?
and what would make you say no?

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shah
Gold Member

England
1356 Posts

Posted - 28 Apr 2009 :  12:44:59 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add shah to your friends list Send shah a Private Message
Welcome to AL and the endurance part

Here's a great article about conformation when choosing an endurance steed: http://www.wessexendurancegb.co.uk/html/item.asp?ItemId=384

I use it all the time at the moment when looking - biggest problem is to remember everything and be objective once you fall in love with a pretty face and cuddly attitude

West Sussex
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dartmoorskier
Junior Member

40 Posts

Posted - 29 Apr 2009 :  2:43:07 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dartmoorskier to your friends list Send dartmoorskier a Private Message
I think everyone has personal likes and dislikes as far as buying a horse goes. Temperament is hugely important as you have to spend a lot of time with your horse! A horse that looks after himself. A horse that's keen to see what's around the next corner. Oops, you asked about conformation. FEET - he'll have his shoes replaced very frequently/before rides. You want a good balance to the horse - i.e. he may move big behind but does he have a good shoulder and can he stretch from in front too. Comfortable to ride! I prefer a horse with bigger joints, short canons, straight legs, moves straight (although you will look hard to find a truly straight moving arab behind). Good second thigh. Good length of rein and well set on neck - easy for him to balance. Just a few of my ramblings.
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Arachnid
Platinum Member


England
1872 Posts

Posted - 30 Apr 2009 :  09:02:57 AM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Arachnid to your friends list Send Arachnid a Private Message
We've (Shah and I) have seen several that dont move very well - ie from the knee rather than from the shoulder so aren't really travelling. These horses would have to work much harder to cover the same ground. On the other hand they may be more comfortable to sit on I suppose!


West Sussex
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Mrs Vlacq
Platinum Member


Wales
3776 Posts

Posted - 14 May 2009 :  10:41:22 AM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Mrs Vlacq to your friends list Send Mrs Vlacq a Private Message
Agree with previous comments, would add look for depth of girth rather than overall height. Good shoulder with somewhere for the saddle to sit. Of course good feet, not too boxy and certainly not flat. Decent width of chest. so many have both front legs 'out of the same hole' (as my uncle used to say.) Short cannons and a decent set of angles in the hind leg. My pet must is that you can fit your fist between jaw bones, allowing for windpipe room.
Temperament, of course a tractable individual but a bit of 'attitude' can give you that extra 'grit' on the high milage rides.
Sometimes a touch of pony blood can make for a clever individual that can look after itself. I personally like Crabbet, Polish and Babson Bloodlines for performance, thats just my bias. Must admit have not competed myself but have bred a good number of sucessful horses.


- V Khazad - V Calacirya & V Sulime - Quarida(L) - V Boogie Knights - V Hamra Tofiq
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Gemma
Platinum Member


United Kingdom
1802 Posts

Posted - 14 May 2009 :  9:39:38 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Gemma to your friends list Send Gemma a Private Message
I agree with all that's been written! Heather's article is really good.

Marygold is an interesting case. Her conformation is good in parts, bad in others.

Good: feet, strong back with somewhere to put a saddle. Good wide chest and deep through the girth.
Bad: short neck, a back that is slightly too long, and a slightly upright shoulder, giving a trot that can be too much knee action.

However, conformation is only part of her make-up. Temperament is VERY important, and hers is excellent. Pretty calm (no energy is wasted in pratting around) but is bloody-minded abour being in front.

Physiology is also important - quick recovery rates.

She's also got a lot of pony breeding, meaning she can find a 5th leg when needed, and has a very strong sense of self-preservation.

But of equal importance is training - the work that I put in. Good conformation and temperament is no good if you don't prepare properly.



Photo 2: West End Photography
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Mrs Vlacq
Platinum Member


Wales
3776 Posts

Posted - 15 May 2009 :  2:05:51 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Mrs Vlacq to your friends list Send Mrs Vlacq a Private Message
Couldn't agree more Gemma. Most competitions are won by the preparation at home. Bourne out by the folks that consistantly get their horses to a high level. Select the best raw material then be thorough in your regime. No horse is perfect, but don't take on too many problems. This said we had a little mare who's hocks touched when she was standing, she never had a day sick, sorry or unsound in her life and she was worked to a grand old age.


- V Khazad - V Calacirya & V Sulime - Quarida(L) - V Boogie Knights - V Hamra Tofiq
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