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 Equine Osteopath? (South-East)
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Pasha
Platinum Member


England

3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  11:30:59 AM  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
Hi - can anyone recommend an Equine Osteopath or similar who treats horses in the South-East (I am in the Westerham area)....

I'm a bit overwhelmed with all the therapists, physios and different techniques that are out there - i'm looking for someone qualified who can identify if there is a problem in the back and treat it.

Thanks

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Adara_Arabians
Gold Member


England
736 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  11:40:56 AM  Show Profile  Click to see Adara_Arabians's MSN Messenger address Bookmark this reply Add Adara_Arabians to your friends list Send Adara_Arabians a Private Message
I can highy recommend a Chiropractor?
Is that somethign you have tried or would be interested in?
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Pasha
Platinum Member


England
3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  11:44:56 AM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
Hmmm what do chiropractor's do?

I'm not sure if Pasha has a problem - he is a little sore (maybe just where he's had a bit of a holiday and has lost back muscle) so want someone to come and check him/treat him if needs be

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Adara_Arabians
Gold Member


England
736 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  12:04:52 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Adara_Arabians's MSN Messenger address Bookmark this reply Add Adara_Arabians to your friends list Send Adara_Arabians a Private Message
Basically i have her come out every 6 months or so, when i did my sponsored rides and when Alaska was covered i also have her out to make sure she is comfortable.

As far as iam knowledgable on them, a Chiropractor will work over the whole body making sure all there bones are all in the correct position.

From having her the first time she was able to tell me her Jaw was out of place, which it was due to a kick.
She also could tell me her Pelvis on one side was out of place, which i knew as she has had a previous covering.

Some people do not belive in this but i pay her £20 per horse and she can confirm that their back isnt out and they are comfortable.
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beau
Gold Member

United Kingdom
806 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  12:31:46 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add beau to your friends list Send beau a Private Message
Hi Lauren could u pls mail me the chiropractors details, jal32@cant.ac.uk

Jodie
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Pasha
Platinum Member


England
3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  12:35:23 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
Originally posted by Adara_Arabians

Basically i have her come out every 6 months or so, when i did my sponsored rides and when Alaska was covered i also have her out to make sure she is comfortable.

As far as iam knowledgable on them, a Chiropractor will work over the whole body making sure all there bones are all in the correct position.

From having her the first time she was able to tell me her Jaw was out of place, which it was due to a kick.
She also could tell me her Pelvis on one side was out of place, which i knew as she has had a previous covering.

Some people do not belive in this but i pay her £20 per horse and she can confirm that their back isnt out and they are comfortable.


Thanks Lauren - is she able to treat them once a problem is identified or do you then need to call someone else? Also, does she hold a qualification? (sorry for all the questions )

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Adara_Arabians
Gold Member


England
736 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  12:51:29 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Adara_Arabians's MSN Messenger address Bookmark this reply Add Adara_Arabians to your friends list Send Adara_Arabians a Private Message
She holds a qualification for human and equine, i belive they must leaqrn on human and then can learn extra for Equine which takes an extra 4 years to study. It takes around 15 mins depending what is wrong with them and yes, if there is anything out of place she puts it back in there and then, if he has a lot wrong she would need to do 1 more follow up in 2 weeks.

She is fantsatic with them an i would recommend this, there is not extra vet treatment or hidden costs either, you cannot ride them for 2 days and then on the 3rd day can only really ride them in a straight line, no bending as they can be sore.

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geegee
Platinum Member


England
3682 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  12:58:11 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add geegee to your friends list Send geegee a Private Message
Pasha,

IMHO - I would be very wary of someone who says that they can put "bones" back in. Bones cannot be manipulated back into place.

If I were in your situation, I would speak to your vet and ask them to recommend somebody, after they have assessed your horse themselves.
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sub
Platinum Member


United Kingdom
1919 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  1:23:19 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add sub to your friends list Send sub a Private Message
Jenny Hadland is fantastic.
She has a team of physio's working for her.

I don't have her contact number anymore (no beasties at the moment) but you should be able to find her through a search engine

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Adara_Arabians
Gold Member


England
736 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  1:27:09 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Adara_Arabians's MSN Messenger address Bookmark this reply Add Adara_Arabians to your friends list Send Adara_Arabians a Private Message
This lady was recommended to me by a vat when Alaska was stiff behind, as a result was her Pelvis.
Medically i cannot explain how she works, but maybe you could do a Google search and find out.

I would be interested to hear what people think of the meaning or can define a horses back being "out"? Out of curisousity.

Gee Gee: I understand people do things differently, i have 4 horses and certainly wouldnt continue to put them at risk, i have used this lady for years and certainly wouldnt reccomended her if i thought she would do more harm than good, but it is only a matter of opinion.
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Adara_Arabians
Gold Member


England
736 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  1:34:02 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Adara_Arabians's MSN Messenger address Bookmark this reply Add Adara_Arabians to your friends list Send Adara_Arabians a Private Message
I hope you find the following information useful:

http://www.gillmaybury.co.uk/equine-frame.html

Spinal misalignment in horses can result in abnormal nerve function, which can manifest itself via poor or decreased athletic performance, behavioural problems, gait problems or lameness.

Such problems may go undiagnosed or not be corrected by more traditional treatments but may respond to chiropractic care. Symptoms of possible problems that may require chiropractic therapy include:

• Uneasy/abnormal posture while standing • Unlevelness or unevenness of steps
• Uneven muscle tone • Tail carried to one side
• Discomfort when grooming the back • Stiffness on one rein or a disunited canter
• Sore areas along the back and spine, being cold backed • Reluctance to jump or other unexplained deterioration in performance
• Unusual sensitivity to touch, hollowing the back and evading contact • Uncharacteristic behaviour patterns or changes of temperament
• Reluctance or discomfort while being saddled or mounted • Lameness after a fall when alternative causes have been ruled out by a vet

Causes
Spinal misalignment in horses may occur as a result of a wide variety of reasons, such as:

• Traumas such as falls, stumbles, slips or getting cast

• Repetitive strain caused by badly fitting tack, poor foot balance/shoeing etc.

Treatments
A prerequisite to any chiropractic treatment being given to an animal is the provision of veterinary approval. As a McTimoney Chiropractor, Gill will insist that such approval is sought and given prior to commencing treatment of the horse. Gill regrets that treatment cannot be provided if such approval is not forthcoming.

Chiropractic treatment is concerned with the musculo-skeletal system and in particular the spine and its relationship with the nervous system. A McTimoney Chiropractor's expertise lies in first evaluating the health and biomechanical function of the horse's spine, then in manipulating the spine and joints of the body to realign the skeletal frame and relieve any associated muscle spasm.

The assessment stage of the treatment begins with a discussion of the horse's health history and current symptoms. This is followed by palpation to discover any muscle spasm or soreness of joints in the spine or pelvis. Passive range of movement is also assessed. The horse's movement is then assessed, including straight line at walk and trot, turning and backing up. Additionally Gill may wish to see the horse being lunged or ridden under saddle. Finally, the horse is further assessed whilst standing square on even ground, allowing Gill to ascertain the muscular balance of the horse. ›››more
Treatments - continued
A horse's spine is a fairly rigid structure and the majority of movement is in the neck and in the lumbar area. The spine is itself a collection of irregular bones known as vertebrae that fit together and work with one another to facilitate movement. The point at which bones meet is called a joint. When joints are taken to the extreme ranges of their movement, the muscles around the joint tighten to prevent further movement, thus providing protection from further injury. Such tightening is often resolved through normal movement but sometimes the muscles can go into spasm and restrict the normal range of movement.

If such misalignments are detected, Gill may determine that chiropractic treatment is appropriate. The treatment usually involves the use of hands to provide rapid and precise manipulations of the problem areas to correct any misalignments and reduce muscle spasm. Gill also may use HWave and laser therapy to enhance and facilitate the manipulation. Such treatment is usually performed in the horse's stable where the animal feels secure and calm.

After treatment, and dependant upon the severity of the injury, horses should be allowed to rest for at least a day or two and/or perhaps have only limited exercise. Gill often recommends exerices to help maintain the improvement and she will happy to advise on a future training plan for your horse. Additional treatments may be required and Gill recommends annual or bi-annual check ups to help maintain optimum health.
Benefits
Many of us will seek chiropractic therapy for our horse once symptoms first appear. However, regular chiropractic care before problems develop is equally important.

As an analogy just think how the tyres on your car wear improperly if the wheels are misaligned - the same problems apply to your horse's spine. Such wear and tear of the spine is called osteoarthritis. Research shows that spinal manipulation may slow progressive degenerative changes that occur as the horse ages. So in addition to a healthy diet and regular exercise, chiropractic therapy can reduce the advancement of osteoarthritic disorders.

Chiropractic therapy performed on a regular basis can also help to maintain the health of the delicate tissues of the spinal cord and nerve roots, leading to a well-adjusted spine, which is important for the prevention of lameness.

Equine chiropractic makes great sense, as treatments help to thwart impending musculo-skeletal ailments, slow the degenerative processes and improve health and well-being. Studies and clinical trials by mainstream medical researchers support the health benefits of spinal manipulation and equine chiropractic care is becoming increasingly popular.
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Pasha
Platinum Member


England
3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  1:34:45 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
Thanks, I actually found an article on Equine Chiropracty on the web and it makes sense... from what I understand, they work with the spine and pelvis, whereas physios and therapists work with muscles and ligaments.

I have called my vet and had no reply, so mum is going to keep calling until we get through as I want someone who can tell me if it's bone, muscle or alien invasion!

Thanks for your help xxx

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Pasha
Platinum Member


England
3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  1:46:44 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
ooh just brought the e-book online on that website "looking after your horses back"... has tips on warming up/cooling down/checking your own saddle etc

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Pasha
Platinum Member


England
3622 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  2:24:52 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Pasha to your friends list Send Pasha a Private Message
Originally posted by sub

Jenny Hadland is fantastic.
She has a team of physio's working for her.

I don't have her contact number anymore (no beasties at the moment) but you should be able to find her through a search engine


Thanks Sub! My vet has come back and recommended Liz Hadland (maybe they are related) - going to trust his advise and give her a go

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katherineepea
Gold Member


England
883 Posts

Posted - 30 Aug 2006 :  9:02:38 PM  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add katherineepea to your friends list Send katherineepea a Private Message
where in south east are you? I had a good man come to see opal just for a check up- not much wrong with him. he also realigned my friends arabs pelvis which had been out for some time but her other back person missed it!!
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